Monday, April 22, 2013

Way More Than a Gust of Wind

Dana Hunter has been doing a series of posts on the Mount Saint Helens eruptions. Her latest is mind bending and a great fun read of awe and destruction http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/rosetta-stones/2013/04/18/the-cataclysm-all-of-the-trees-seemed-to-come-down-at-once/. The timber industry really needs to take action against volcanoes.

I "met" Dana via the geo blogosphere. She had kind comments regarding my early posts and I have very much enjoyed reading her posts as she has morphed into a geologist. And she is an amazing researcher constantly turning up fun stuff and writing geology with great enthusiasm.

3 comments:

Geoffrey Middaugh said...

The 1962 Columbus Day storm is known to foresters as the largest ecological disturbance in history for the temperate rain forests. Wind is one of two key change agents to the temperate rain forest: wind and fire. Wind is more frequent than fire. Mt. St. Helens was a little of both.

Geoffrey Middaugh said...

Oh, and history means post-European settlement recorded history.

Dan McShane said...

A future post is in my head about an the wind aspect of the December 2007 storm. Lots on landslides and flooding, but the wind damage was very costly.